Category: Disney history

BUMPS AND SHIVERS….YES, EVEN AT DISNEY!

   They go bump in the night and send shivers down your spine. Your nightmares.  The stairs creak because a ghost is walking. Do these things keep you awake at night? Then you probably shouldn’t keep reading.

        Something that feels so right has to be.. wrong, right? Or at least eerily spooky? Disney is so much fun that there have to be some skeletons hiding in the closet, or “secret underworld” that lies behind the scenes.  

Ever wonder why the light is kept on in the apartment above the firehouse on Main Street in the Magic Kingdom? No, there are not firefighters in there. That is Walt Disney’s actual apartment.  After Walt died, Disney employees tried to turn the light off but it always turns back on.. 

 

two people dressed as ghost
Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com
  • The Pirates of Caribbean Ride is constructed with real bones, I have mentioned this before.  Do cast member still conveniently dispose bodies there? That’s for you to guess and for me to never find out. 

     

  • Disney’s Main Street is haunted by more than just Walt Disney.  A lady in white wonders the streets at all hours. She was killed on Main Street’s grounds before Disney built his empire. She has never been put to rest, and is constantly wandering the streets and checking storefronts for her children. Legend has it that she has been known to have guided actual lost children to the Baby Care Center. Would you trust her with your kids? Instead of telling my kids to look for “the lady in white” I usually make sure that we all decide on a designated area should they get lost.. but that’s just me. 
    adult bridal bride brunette
    Photo by Oleksandr Pidvalnyi on Pexels.com

     

  • Do you ever ride the monorail? One teenager tried to sneak into Disneyland in 1966 by climbing a fence, a fence that led right to the monorail tracks. He was then decapitated, run over by the same train that was supposed to take him to experience the joy of Disney.  If you look closely, more than a few people have spotted him running alongside the train. 
    bridge clouds cloudy dark clouds
    Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

     

  • Several people report that a small boy stands at the exit of the Haunted Mansion, crying. When a guest or employee tries to speak to him, he ignores them as if they are not there.  Well, he is not there. He is of another dimension. Possibly one of the ashes scattered around the Haunted Mansion.  Click here to learn more. 

    time lapse photography of four black metal cooking wares
    Photo by Devon Rockola on Pexels.com

 

Is your spine tingling yet? There are more real life accounts of employees who have passed in very gruesome ways, but I will save these for another day.

 

Half a league, Half a league onward – Boldly these Disney characters have rode into battle

In Honor of Veterans Day, we think of soldiers past and present, fictional and non-fictional. From Fa Mulan to Captain America. To the rare toy soldier occasionally seen at a Disney park on a holiday. Did anyone else hear the rumor that GI Joe may be coming to Disney? Anyway, with respect, honor, & gratitude, Thank You Veterans. Real heroes. We are the home of the free, because of The Brave.

The Charge of the Light Brigade

–Alfred Tennyson–

       I
HALF a league, half a league, 
   Half a league onward, 
All in the valley of Death 
   Rode the six hundred. 
‘Forward, the Light Brigade! 
Charge for the guns!’ he said: 
Into the valley of Death 
   Rode the six hundred.

       II
‘Forward, the Light Brigade!’
Was there a man dismay’d? 
Not tho’ the soldier knew 
   Some one had blunder’d: 
Their’s not to make reply, 
Their’s not to reason why, 
Their’s but to do and die: 
Into the valley of Death 
   Rode the six hundred.

       III 
Cannon to right of them, 
Cannon to left of them, 
Cannon in front of them 
   Volley’d and thunder’d; 
Storm’d at with shot and shell, 
Boldly they rode and well, 
Into the jaws of Death, 
Into the mouth of Hell 
   Rode the six hundred.

       IV
Flash’d all their sabres bare, 
Flash’d as they turn’d in air 
Sabring the gunners there, 
Charging an army, while 
   All the world wonder’d: 
Plunged in the battery-smoke 
Right thro’ the line they broke; 
Cossack and Russian 
Reel’d from the sabre-stroke 
   Shatter’d and sunder’d. 
Then they rode back, but not 
   Not the six hundred.

       V
Cannon to right of them, 
Cannon to left of them, 
Cannon behind them 
   Volley’d and thunder’d; 
Storm’d at with shot and shell, 
While horse and hero fell, 
They that had fought so well 
Came thro’ the jaws of Death, 
Back from the mouth of Hell, 
All that was left of them, 
   Left of six hundred.

       VI
When can their glory fade? 
O the wild charge they made! 
   All the world wonder’d. 
Honour the charge they made! 
Honour the Light Brigade, 
   Noble six hundred!

And now, my favorite rendition of the Star Spangled Banner…RIP Whitney.

 

GOD BLESS THE USA AND HAPPY VETERANS DAY

 

YES VIRGINIA THERE IS A DISNEY WORLD. UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH WALT DISNEY’S FIRST MUSE, “ALICE”.

This used to be Disney’s playground. His pride and joy began at the age of 19/20 when he began shooting his first series of films with a 4 year old actress named Virginia Davis.  On October 16, 1923, “Alice’s Day at Sea”began production. So even though some people think it all started with a mouse, it really all began with a character named Alice. 

Walt Disney clearly did not write the famous “Alice in Wonderland”, which was created by Lewis Carroll. Disney did feel that Alice in Wonderland was the perfect story medium for his early career as a filmmaker.  It took him about twenty years to recreate Lewis Carroll’s story in its entirety.

Here’s an excerpt from the first film made with Virginia Davis playing Alice, taken from Youtube. 

 The films began shooting in Missouri,  in Virginia’s actual home, because Walt was operating on a limited budget. Disney eventually moved the entire production to Hollywood, LA, where his brother Roy was recovering from tuberculosis. They set up a small studio in a garage, negotiating with a film distributor to produce one “Alice” picture a month. 

Virginia was paid $100 a month starting out. By the end of the year it went up to $200 a year – which was a great salary for the early 1920s.  

Some people think that Virginia Davis was eventually replaced by Disney because she aged out of the role. The truth is that she ended up moving on because her mother was not happy with her contract. Ms. Davis’ mom even turned down the speaking role of “Snow White”, which would have required her daughter to stop working for three years while the film was in production. Can you imagine living your entire life knowing that you turned down that role? 

They always say “no regrets”. But I am sure she regretted her mother’s decision to turn down her new contract. Over the next twenty years, until the 1940s, Davis went onto work for other studios in other films, sometimes under the screen name of “Mary Daily”. After she was married in 1943, she slowly ended her film career to start a family.

In 2009, Virginia Davis passed away at the age of 90. August 15th will mark the anniversary of her death. Although there were several child actors before her, she certainly made her mark as one of the more memorable early film stars of the United States, even preceeding Shirley Temple (who also had beautiful curls). 

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